Monday, 22 June 2015

Scarborough Fair


Scarborough Fair is part of a Yorkshire medley that we sing. Wiki says '"Scarborough Fair" is a traditional English Ballad about the Yorkshire town of Scarborough. The song relates the tale of a young man who instructs the listener to tell his former love to perform for him a series of impossible tasks, such as making him a shirt without a seam and then washing it in a dry well, adding that if she completes these tasks he will take her back. Often the song is sung as a duet, with the woman then giving her lover a series of equally impossible tasks, promising to give him his seamless shirt once he has finished.


Paul Simon learned the song in London in 1965 from Martin Carthy who had picked up the tune from the songbook by Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger.


Martin Carthy - Scarborough Fair - click for utube

BBC's Soul Music  - click for podcast

Saturday, 20 June 2015

Last reminder - Concert for Nepal


Nepal Earthquake Fundraising Concert


7:30pm Thursday 25th June
Denby Dale Methodist Church HD8 8QS
New Mill Male Voice Choir will be appearing with Skelmanthorpe Brass Band as guests of Denby Dale Rotary Club to raise funds for the Nepal Earthquake Appeal


tickets £8 from P. Coates 663808
or M. Tagg 540050tt

Monday, 15 June 2015

Mischa Maisky plays Bach Cello Suite No.1 in G (full)




Click on to hear BBC's soul music's take on the piece


Nepal needs your support - concert 25th June




Nepal Earthquake Fundraising Concert


7:30pm Thursday 25th June
Denby Dale Methodist Church HD8 8QS
New Mill Male Voice Choir will be appearing with Skelmanthorpe Brass Band as guests of Denby Dale Rotary Club to raise funds for the Nepal Earthquake Appeal


tickets £8 from P. Coates 663808
or M. Tagg 540050ttt


Sunday, 14 June 2015

When and how? (From Wiki)

"Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" has been sung by rugby players and fans for some decades,[6] and there are associated gestures, sometimes used in a drinking game, which requires those who wrongly perform the gestures to buy a round of drinks.[7][8] It became associated with the English national side, in particular, in 1988. Coming into the last match of the 1988 season, against Ireland at Twickenham, England had lost 15 of their previous 23 matches in the Five Nations Championship. The Twickenham crowd had only seen one solitary England try in the previous two years and at half time against Ireland they were 0–3 down. However during the second half England scored six tries to give them a 35–3 win. Three of the tries came in quick succession from Chris Oti making his Twickenham debut. A group of boys from the Benedictine school Douai following a tradition at their school games sang "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" whenever a try was scored. When Oti scored his second try, amused spectators standing close to the boys joined in, and when Oti scored his hat-trick the song was heard around the ground.[6][9][10] The song is still regularly sung at matches by English supporters.[11]